Why is mentoring meaningful?

Mentoring offers a systematic and structured learning experience in a more individualized way. It also improves the student's self-esteem, attitude to the subject and academic performance, as well as personal growth.

Why is mentoring meaningful?

Mentoring offers a systematic and structured learning experience in a more individualized way. It also improves the student's self-esteem, attitude to the subject and academic performance, as well as personal growth. In addition to that, tutoring is a self-guided and self-directed learning process. Every child learns in a different way.

Some take a little longer to collect the information that is taught in school, while others need a challenge. Tutors are vital to the educational process because they go beyond the attention given to a student in a normal classroom. A good tutor provides a sense of competence to their students, encourages higher-level thinking, reteaches material as needed in a non-threatening environment, teaches self-learning style, knows the content material, provides empathy to the student, is an excellent resource for parents, and coordinates with the child's teacher. Tutoring will prepare your child for tests and exams, while tutors work with your child on specific problem areas.

For tutoring to be productive, the student needs to feel comfortable enough to be unsure in front of the tutor that they make mistakes, ask questions, and talk about the difficulties they are having. One of the great benefits of tutoring is the opportunity to customize tutoring experiences to ensure that every student learns effectively in the way that works best for them. Mentoring can also lead to improvements in self-confidence about reading, motivation to read, and behavior, both among tutors and peer-to-peer or cross-age tutors. The tutor can even contact the child's teacher to learn more about the student's needs and how best to approach teaching tutoring.

Students who improve as a result of peer-to-peer mentoring may be more inclined to give back to their college communities, for example, by mentoring or mentoring prospective students, as they become more comfortable in their own skin and are confident in their abilities. When tutoring is coordinated with good classroom reading practices, students perform better than when tutoring is not related to classroom instruction. Because many guardians are close in age to their guardians, they can often form better personal connections that transcend the mentoring relationship. For example, all students in the mathematics department can receive up to 12 free hours of tutoring from a trained peer tutor who has scored highly in the relevant class.

One of the benefits of one-on-one tutoring is that a tutor can identify and manage any learning difficulties that a student is facing, facing them head-on. Peer mentoring programs at universities have been documented as far back as the 18th century, and have become increasingly popular in recent years, with hundreds of institutions having some form of peer-to-peer tutoring or peer-to-peer learning.

Lipa Bunton
Lipa Bunton

Future teacher-I hope! I am currently at university in England. I got into blogging during lockdown, which is when I became an online tutee too! I love blogging and love tutoring. I'm also a total maths geek. I've been tutoring GCSE students for a while, and this is a blog about GCSE tutoring.